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May 2013
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Dear Beth Panaccione,

Generic drug makers should be held responsible when their products harm people, just as their brand-name counterparts are. But a loophole is letting them off the hook. This is troubling when nearly 80 percent of all U.S. prescriptions are generics.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS
The Law Offices of Doroshow, Pasquale, Krawitz & Bhaya wishes you and your family a safe and wonderful holiday season.

Continue reading.

Ruling May Leave You Vulnerable to Unsafe Generic Drugs

Question Mark
Why are generic drugs treated differently than brand-names when they cause harm? Answer here.

You probably never think twice about filling your prescriptions with generic drugs. They are much cheaper than brand-names, and they perform exactly the same as the original, right?

But what if something goes terribly wrong like it did for Karen Bartlett when she took a generic painkiller for shoulder pain? Soon after, two-thirds of Karen’s skin began shedding off. Or Kira Gilbert, who took the generic Darvocet in advance of knee surgery and never woke up?

Because of a startling Supreme Court ruling, generic drug manufacturers cannot be held accountable in court for failing to warn consumers like Karen and Kira about deadly side-effects. Since 80 percent of the 4 billion prescriptions written in America are now filled with generics, You Should Know the facts and what consumer advocates are doing to stop this injustice. Families seek justice.  >>>

BY THE NUMBERS /

2 to 4
Million
Hurt

 

Between 2 to 4 million Americans suffered serious, disabling or fatal injuries after using prescription drugs in 2011, based on estimates from data issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Source: QuarterWatch May 2012, Institute for Safe Medication Practices

80
Percent
Generic

 
Even though nearly 80 percent of all prescriptions written in the United States are filled with generic drugs, the U.S. Supreme Court recently made it nearly impossible to bring suit against generic drug manufacturers when their products cause injury.

Source: Generic Drugs, Take Justice Back
2/3
Labeled
Wrong
A new study finds that more than two-thirds of generic drugs have some labeling discrepancies. Of more than 1,000 generic drugs reviewed, most had small differences compared to brand-name drugs. However, 9 percent had differences of more than 10 side effects.

Source: Inconsistency Seen in Safety Labeling for Generic Drugs, US News & World Report Health
BOOKMARK FAVORITES /

Campaign Wants Accountability for Generic Drug Makers

Take Justice Back is fighting to hold generic drug companies accountable when they cause serious injury or death. Listen to Karen Bartlett’s tragic story and learn about ways you can help make a difference.

Stay Informed About Unsafe Drugs

Stay informed with drug alerts and recalls, search for approved drugs, and access educational resources on drugs and generics – including online alerts and podcasts – from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Misuse of Prescription Drugs Kill More than Car Accidents

The abuse and misuse of prescription drugs – especially painkillers – is a U.S. epidemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and now causes more deaths than car accidents.

What’s Your Drug Safety IQ? Take Our Snapshot Survey

Adverse side effects from a long list of medications are on the rise in America. How much do you know about the prescription drugs in your medicine cabinet?

Take survey now

“Who’s Responsible?” Asks Mother of
Kira Nicole Gilbert

Kira Gilbert, a 22-year-old college student, died suddenly after she was prescribed a defective generic painkiller. Her mother, Tammy, tells Kira’s story on the fourth anniversary of her death.

Listen now

 
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